/five at the Huntington

L-R: Beatriz Santiago-Muñoz, Robin Coste Lewis, Nina Katchadourian, Dana Johnson & Rosten Woo
Photo: Kate Lain
Photo: Kate Lain
Photo: Kate Lain
Photo: Kate Lain
Photo: Kate Lain
Photo: Kate Lain
Photo: Kate Lain
Photo: Kate Lain
Photo: Kate Lain
Photo: Kate Lain
Photo: Kate Lain

Clockshop is excited to partner with the Huntington Library on the fourth iteration of their /five program.

For this partnership, Clockshop has invited three artists and two writers to explore the Huntington’s vast rare books, art and botanical collections to create new work that will premiere in an exhibition this November. The selected artists and writers will use the Huntington’s early editions of Thomas More’s socio-political satire Utopia (1516) as a point of departure to consider ideas of perfection and utopian aspirations.

Artists & Writers

Dana Johnson is a writer and Associate Professor of English at the University of Southern California. She is the author of the short story collection In the Not Quite Dark (2016); Break Any Woman Down (2001), winner of the Flannery O’Connor Award for Short Fiction; and the short story collection Elsewhere, California (2012). Her work is located in well-drawn characters, vivid descriptions of Los Angeles, and nuanced reflections on money, race, and family. In “The Story of Biddy Mason” (Elsewhere, California), Johnson considers Huntington’s legacy and its influence upon Los Angeles in what Kirkus Review describes as “the most powerful view of the palimpsest of this American city.”

Nina Katchadourian is an interdisciplinary artist whose work includes video, performance, sound, sculpture, photography and public projects. Group exhibitions have included shows at the Serpentine Gallery, the Venice Biennial, Turner Contemporary, de Appel, Palais de Tokyo, Istanbul Museum of Modern Art, Turku Art Museum, Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, ICA Philadelphia and Brooklyn Museum. Her work is in collections including The Metropolitan Museum of Art, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Margulies Collection, and Saatchi Gallery. She is an associate professor at NYU Gallatin.

Robin Coste Lewis is the Poet Laureate for the City of Los Angeles and a 2019 Guggenheim fellow. She is the author of Voyage of the Sable Venus (2015), winner of the National Book Award for poetry. Lewis is also the author of a series of commissioned poems that accompany Robert Rauschenberg’s drawings in Thirty-Four Illustrations for Dante’s Inferno (MoMA). Her writing has appeared in The New Yorker, The Harvard Gay and Lesbian Review, Best American Poetry, Callaloo, Transition, and Vida. Lewis earned her MFA from New York University’s creative writing program and a PhD from the University of Southern California. Lewis was also a finalist for the International War Poetry Prize, the National Rita Dove Prize, the California Book Award, the LA Times Book Prize, and the Hurston/Wright Award.

Beatriz Santiago Muñoz is an artist based in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Her work combines aspects of ethnography and theater to create film and video projects that have touched on subjects including anarchist communities, the relationship between artwork and work, and post-military land. Her work has been exhibited at the Tate Modern, the Whitney Biennial 2017, Galería Kurimanzutto, and the Guggenheim Museum.

Rosten Woo is an artist, designer, writer, and educator who helps people re-orient themselves to places, establishing a collaborative process to create platforms for the sharing of ideas. He is a consultant to numerous grassroots organizations including the Black Workers Center, Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy, and the Esperanza Community Housing Corporation. Woo’s work has been exhibited at the Cooper-Hewitt Design Triennial, the Venice Architecture Biennale, Netherlands Architectural Institute, and various piers, public housing developments, shopping malls, and parks in New York and Los Angeles. He is co-founder and former executive director of the Center for Urban Pedagogy, dedicated to using art and design to foster civic participation, winner of the 2016 National Design Award for institutional achievement.