The Bowtie

Where is the Bowtie located?

The entrance to the Bowtie is located at:
2780 W. Casitas Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90039

How do I get there?

The Bowtie can be accessed by car from the 2N at San Fernando Road, the 2S at Fletcher Drive, or the 5S at Fletcher Drive. The nearest bus stop is the Metro Rapid Line 794 stop at San Fernando Rd/Fletcher Dr. From this stop, it is about a 15-20 minute walk through a small neighborhood and beneath a freeway overpass.

From 2N
Exit at San Fernando Rd.
Left turn onto San Fernando Rd.
Left turn onto Fletcher Dr.
Left turn onto La Clede Ave. (1st street after passing under the bridge)
Left turn onto Carillon St. (end of the road)
Right turn onto Casitas Ave. (end of the road)
Continue on Casitas under the 2 freeway. You will pass Nelson Miller on your right. Enter through the yellow gate, and veer to the right for parking on the gravel lot.

From 2S
Exit at Fletcher Dr.
Right turn onto Fletcher Dr.
Right turn onto Larga Ave.
Follow around to the left (becomes Carillon St.)
Continue to the end of the road
Right turn onto Casitas Ave.
Continue on Casitas under the 2 freeway. You will pass Nelson Miller on your right. Enter through the yellow gate, and veer to the right for parking on the gravel lot.

From 5S
Exit at Fletcher Dr.
Left turn onto Fletcher Dr.
Right turn onto Larga Ave.
Follow around to the left (becomes Carillon St.)
Continue to the end of the road
Right turn onto Casitas Ave.
Continue on Casitas under the 2 freeway. You will pass Nelson Miller on your right. Enter through the yellow gate, and veer to the right for parking on the gravel lot.

From 5N
Exit to 2N, follow directions for 2N

What’s happening at the Bowtie?

2021 is an important year for the Bowtie’s future as a state park. The California State Parks Department is partnering with Clockshop to launch a community listening process to hear directly from residents on what they want and need in the future park. Community feedback is essential. It will be used to guide and inform the design of the park, and to advocate for the resources needed to make the project happen.

How can I get involved?

Stay tuned on this page for information about community engagement events. Over the next few months, we will be joining community meetings, hosting online events, using surveys and engaging local residents to hear their ideas for the future park.

Is the Bowtie part of the 100 Acres Partnership?

The Bowtie is part of a larger effort to turn neighboring lots owned by other city and state agencies into 100-acres of contiguous green space, and the Bowtie is the next piece of that larger effort. Known as the 100 Acre Partnership, the vision is to revitalize a large portion of Taylor Yards, the former headquarters of Southern Pacific Railroad, into multiple community parks along the Los Angeles River.

What does passive recreation mean?

Passive recreation focuses on green space conservation and habitat restoration to give local residents a place to enjoy nature. Unlike the neighboring Rio de Los Angeles State Park, where residents can play soccer and other active sports, the Bowtie will be a place for hikes, picnics, bird watching and cultural programming. Community residents will help us determine what activities and features they want to see in their future park.

When will the State Park at the Bowtie be completed?

California State Parks purchased the 18-acre bowtie-shaped parcel in 2003 to conserve the property for green space in perpetuity and to make a community vision of park space along a revitalized Los Angeles River a reality. Over the years, the Bowtie project team has collaborated with other state and city agencies to plan and prepare for next steps. Led by Clockshop, community events have engaged local residents in envisioning the possibilities at the future park. The 2021 community engagement process kicks off next steps for design and planning, making it possible to advocate for the resources needed to make the Bowtie project a reality. Please check this webpage for developments and updates.

Will the future State Park at the Bowtie be safe?

The future Bowtie State Park currently is 18 acres of undeveloped industrial land. Soil testing at the site over the years has not found contaminant issues above levels of concern. Park construction will include soil remediation plans modeled on best practices that have been used to improve other park spaces, including Rio de Los Angeles State Park.

Why is this area of Taylor Yard being turned into a park?

Local residents led the vision to conserve the area around the Los Angeles River that is now known as the Bowtie for a future park. The property was purchased by the California State Parks Department to protect the area in perpetuity for park space and ensure access to a future revitalized Los Angeles River. Nearby properties were purchased by other city and state agencies to fulfill a community vision to create 100 acres of river-adjacent park space in portions of the former Taylor Yard, paving the way to transform this section of northeast Los Angeles into vibrant green space.

How is Clockshop involved with the Bowtie?

Clockshop is a local arts organization that has hosted over 100 events at the Bowtie, to help envision the possibilities of a future park. Clockshop has helped to activate the site by bringing people together using art and activities to engage local residents with the space. Currently, Clockshop is leading community outreach efforts to engage residents in planning the future of the park.

What does G1 and G2 mean?

G1 is an outdated reference to the Bowtie parcel. A city-owned 42-acre property that is adjacent to the Bowtie is still referenced as the G2 parcel.

What is the Bowtie demonstration project?

Led by The Nature Conservancy, the 2.5-acre pilot project will feature habitat and recreational features that are possible at the Bowtie.